G.W. Lynch: Civil War

Did George W. Lynch serve in the Civil War?  The fact that he and Cyllanae had no children for five years, from 1861-1866, corresponding to the Civil War years, indicates he probably did.

What appears to be his family is listed as a Confederate Indigent Family in Grimes county on the "Confederate Indigent Families Lists 1863-1865".1 See "Grimes County, TX - Military - Confederate Indigent Families".

It is unclear where George was living when he enlisted.  He married, is on the census and signed the resolution in Harris county in 1860, but he grew up in Grimes county and later lived in Waller county.  The 4th Texas Infantry enlisted men from Grimes county.  The 20th enlisted men from Grimes, Harris and Waller counties.

George Lynch would have been 21 or 22 when he enlisted.  The man who enlisted in the 2nd Cavalry was 19, though it did recruit from Houston.  The man who enlisted in Waterhouse's 19th was 31 years old and it recruited from north Texas counties.  The man who enlisted in the 4th went in as a Sergeant and his alternate middle initial was "E".  The man who enlisted in the 20th went in as a private and it recruited from Grimes, Harris and Waller counties.

It appears George Lynch served in the 20th Infantry Regiment as it recruited from all three counties where he had lived and the rank of private seems more likely for a poor farmer.

Search Texas, Civil War Service Records of Confederate Soldiers, 1861-1865 at FamilySearch.org

  • 1863 - G. W. Lynch; 19 years old (b. 1844).  Second Cavalry, State Troops (Six Months, 1863-64) AND Second Battalion, Cavalry, State Troops (Six Months, 1863-64).
  • 1863 - G. W. Lynch; 19 years old (b. 1844).  Second Cavalry, State Troops (Six Months, 1863-64) AND Second Battalion, Cavalry, State Troops (Six Months, 1863-64).
  • 1861-1865 - G. W. Lynch, private; 2nd Battalion, Texas Cavalry State Troops (6 months, company A.
  • 1863 - G. W. Lynch; 19 years old (b. 1844).  Second Cavalry, State Troops (Six Months, 1863-64) AND Second Battalion, Cavalry, State Troops (Six Months, 1863-64).
  • 1861-1865 - G. W. Lynch; private; 20th Regiment, Texas Infantry (Elmore's); company I. (ancestry.com).
  • 1861 to 1865 - G. Linch, private; 20th Regiment, Texas Infantry (Elmore's). (ancestry.com).
  • 1861-1865 - G. W. Lynch, corporal; 19th Regiment, Texas Infantry, company G. (ancestry.com)
  • 1861-1865 - G. W. Lynch; Well's Regiment, Texas Cavalry, company I. (ancestry.com)
  • 1863 - G. W. Lynch; Wells' Cavalry.

This is Richard Waterhouse's 19th Texas Infantry.

Enlisted May 6, 1862 at Daingerfield, Texas, 31 years old, born circa 1831.  The George W. Lynch of this study was born circa 1839-1840.

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C3WS-ZSQX-9?cc=3736261

Name & Rank: Lynch, G. W. 1st Corpl.
Comm. OFF: Fargason, L. M., Capt.
Organ: Co. in Col. R. Waterhouse's Regt., TV CSA
Enlist: May 6-62 at Daingerfield for 3 yrs or the war.
Disch;
Descrip: Age 31
Remarks: R&F 72; Capt. Fargason, E. Off.; R. Waterouse, Mus. Off.; Co. stationed at Jefferson, Tex. May 6-62; 30 miles to rendez. 1 MR dated May 6-62.

Daingerfield is the county seat of Morris County, Texas, about 100 miles due east of Dallas.

Name G. W. Lynch
Age 19
Birth Year (Estimated) 1844
Military Unit Second Cavalry, State Troops (Six Months, 1863-64) AND Second Battalion, Cavalry, State Troops (Six Months, 1863-64)
Event Date 1863
Film Number M323

  He resided in Titus county but enlisted Aug. 1, 186- at Dangerfield for 6 months.  image fold3.com.

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FZ4P-PG7 FamilySearch.org

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FZ4P-PGW FamilySearch.org

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FZ4P-PGQ FamilySearch.org

Second Texas Cavalry, Brett J. Derbes, "Second Texas Cavalry," Handbook of Texas Online

2nd Regiment, Texas Cavalry (2nd Mounted Rifles) 2nd Cavalry Regiment, about 1,200 strong, was organized in May, 1861, under the designation of the 2nd Texas Mounted Rifles. It was reorganized in April, 1862, as the 2nd Cavalry Regiment. The men were recruited in San Antonio, Houston, Marshall, and Beeville, and the counties of Anderson, Houston, Nacogdoches, and Cherokee. Serving in the Trans-Mississippi Department, it was active in various conflicts in the New Mexico Territory and Louisiana, then saw action in the defense of Galveston. In November, 1862, the unit totalled 752 effectives, had 19 officers and 167 men in July, 1864, and about 150 present in April, 1865. Although it was included in the surrender on June 2, it had previously disbanded. The field officers were Colonels John S. Ford and Charles L. Pyron; Lieutenant Colonels John R. Baylor and James Walker; and Majors John Donelson, Matthew Nolan, William A. Spencer, and Edward Waller, Jr. — National Park Service.

Name George W. Lynch
Side Confederate
Regiment State/Origin Texas
Regiment 4th Regiment, Texas Infantry
Company A
Rank In Sergeant
Rank Out First Lieutenant
Alternate Name George E./Lynch
Film Number M227 roll 22

AKA George E. Lynch

https://www.ancestry.com/discoveryui-content/view/5555929:1138

* 4th Texas Infantry The Civil War in the East — details.

4th Infantry Regiment completed its organization at Richmond, Virginia. Its members were recruited in the counties of Goliad, Travis, Robertson, Falls, Guadalupe, McLennan, Bexar, Grimes, Walker, Hill, Montgomery, Freestone, Navarro, Ellis, and Henderson. It became part of Hood's Texas Brigade and served under Generals Hood, J.B. Robertson, and J. Gregg. The 4th participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from Seven Pines to Cold Harbor except when it was with Longstreet at Suffolk, Chickamauga, and Knoxville. It continued the fight in the Petersburg trenches north and south of the James River and in various conflicts around Appomattox. The regiment had 470 effectives in April, 1862 and lost fifty-four percent of the 200 engaged at Sharpsburg and more than twenty-five percent of the 415 at Gettysburg. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered 15 officers and 145 men. The field officers were Colonels John P. Bane, John B. Hood, John C.G. Key, and John Marshall; Lieutenant Colonels Benjamin F. Carter, Bradfute Warwick, and Clinton M. Winkler; and Majors William H. Martin and W.P. Townsend. 4th Regiment, Texas Infantry National Park Service

4th Texas Infantry Regiment wikipedia — Co. A, Hardeman Rifles, Gonzales county; Co. G, Grimes county Greys, Grimes county.

Name G. W. Lynch
Side Confederate
Regiment State/Origin Texas
Regiment 19th Regiment, Texas Infantry
Company G
Rank In Corporal
Rank Out Corporal
Film Number M227 roll 22
Other Records Learn about this Regiment

https://www.ancestry.com/discoveryui-content/view/5491297:1138

The 19th Infantry regiment was assembled and accepted into Confederate service at San Augustine, Texas, in May, 1862. Many of its members were raised at Mt. Vernon, Jefferson, and Carthage, and in Rusk County. The unit was attached to Flournoy's, Waterhouse's, and Scurry's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and fought in Louisiana and Arkansas.  It lost 2 killed, 11 wounded, and 6 missing at Milliken's Bend, was active in the operations against Banks' Red River Campaign, and participated in the fight at Jenkins' Ferry. Later Company K was detached to Marshall, Texas, for guard duty, and the remaining companies disbanded before the surrender in June, 1865.  The field officers were Colonels Ennis W. Taylor and Richard Waterhouse, Jr., Lieutenant Colonels William L. Crawford and Robert H. Graham; and Major Augustus C. Allen. 19th Regiment, Texas Infantry National Park Service.

19th Texas Infantry Regiment wikipedia

Name George Lynch
Side Confederate
Regiment State/Origin Texas
Regiment 20th Regiment, Texas Infantry (Elmore's)
Company I
Rank In Private
Rank Out Private
Film Number M227 roll 22
Battles Galveston Island – Jan. 1, 1863

https://www.ancestry.com/discoveryui-content/view/5487714:1138

The Twentieth Texas Infantry was organized in the spring of 1862 at Galveston, Texas, to serve in the defense of the state’s coastline. The regiment was made up of primarily middle-aged wealthy men of some level of prominence. The regiment consisted of ten companies, lettered A to K, from the counties of Anderson, Austin, Falls, Galveston, Grimes, Harris, Kaufman, Montgomery, Polk, Robertson, Walker, Waller, Washington, and Williamson. Col. Henry M. Elmore commanded the regiment, and its field officers were Lt. Col. Leonard A. Abercrombie and Maj. Robert E. Bell.  Throughout the war the regiment spent most of its time serving in and around Galveston. Early in 1863 the men of the regiment were trained to use heavy artillery along the coast. The only combat the regiment took part in was the battle of Galveston on January 1, 1863. On January 3, 1863, a detachment of the regiment also took part in a skirmish at Galveston. Both engagements were Confederate victories. By April 1864 the regiment had twenty-one officers and 622 men present for coastal defense. The Twentieth Texas Infantry was present at Galveston when the Trans-Mississippi Department surrendered on June 2, 1865. Twentieth Texas Infantry - James A. Hathcock, "Twentieth Texas Infantry," Handbook of Texas Online

20th Regiment, Texas Infantry (Elmore's) National Park Service

Name G. Linch
Side Confederate
Regiment State/Origin Texas
Regiment 20th Regiment, Texas Infantry (Elmore's)
Company I
Rank In Private
Rank Out Private
Alternate Name George Lynch
Film Number M227 roll 22

https://www.ancestry.com/discoveryui-content/view/5487653:1138

Name G. W. Lynch
Side Confederate
Regiment State/Origin Texas
Regiment Well's Regiment, Texas Cavalry
Company I
Film Number M227 roll 22

G. W. Lynch is AWOL from March 6, 1865.  image fold3.com.

https://www.ancestry.com/discoveryui-content/view/5426856:1138

Wells's Texas Battalion Charles D. Grear, "Wells's Texas Battalion," Handbook of Texas Online.

Wells' Cavalry Battalion [also called 34th Battalion completed its organization at Doaksville, Indian Territory, during the fall of 1863. Attached to the Trans-Mississippi Department, the unit primarily skirmished the Federals in the Indian Territory. During March, 1864, part were stationed at Fort Arbuckle and part at Fort Washita. Early in 1865 it was reorganized as Wells' Cavalry Regiment, but it was soon dismounted and ordered to Houston. It was included in the surrender in June. Lieutenant Colonel John W. Wells was in command. Well's Battalion, Texas Cavalry National Park Service.


Footnotes

  1. Confederate Indigent Families Lists of Texas 1863-1865. Geo. Lynch, Grimes county, Texas. San Marcos, Texas: L. Mearse, 1995.

Newspaper articles may be read at Timeline of News Reports.